The British Beekeepers Association 

 

Andover Beekeepers subscribe fully to and concur with the policy below from the BBKA. Where BBKA is mentioned within the text then ADBK – Andover Beekeepers Association can be substituted. January 2023 – this policy will be reviewed regularly. 

BBKA Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults Policy  

 Issue: 12 November 2022   

 

This policy cancels and replaces any earlier dated editions of the Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults Policy. This Policy is to be reviewed annually or as and when legislation changes. 

Terms  

Child/Children Young Person/Young People: Refers to all children/young people under the age of 18 years for the purposes of this Policy.  

Designated Safeguarding Officer (DSO): an appointed trustee or employee responsible for all safeguarding matters within the BBKA.  

Parents/Guardians: Those who have parental rights and responsibilities in relation to children and young people. For the purposes of these guidelines it also covers carers, legal guardians and others who have the primary responsibility for the care of children and young people.  

Responsible Adult: Refers to persons who are current members of the BBKA and desirably, part of the training team of their Division. 

Vulnerable Adult: Is any person aged 18 or over. ‘A vulnerable adult may be elderly, physically and/or mentally disabled or have learning difficulties. A person who is, or may be in need of community care services by reason of their disability, age or illness’. 

The Department of Education defines safeguarding children in ‘Working together to safeguard children’ as: 

  • protecting children from maltreatment; 
  • preventing impairment of children’s health or development; 
  • ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; 
  • taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes. 

Guidance published under the Care Act 2014 defines safeguarding vulnerable adults as: 

  • protecting the rights of adults to live in safety, free from abuse and neglect; 
  • people and organisations working together to prevent and stop both the risks and experience of abuse or neglect; 
  • people and organisations making sure that the adult’s wellbeing is promoted including, where appropriate, taking fully into account their views, wishes, feelings and beliefs in deciding on any action; 
  • recognising that adults sometimes have complex interpersonal relationships and may be ambivalent, unclear or unrealistic about their personal circumstances and therefore potential risks to their safety or well-being. 

Foreword - The purpose and scope of this policy  

This policy is a way of demonstrating that the British Beekeepers’ Association (BBKA) understands its responsibilities towards keeping individuals safe from harm and that we have measures and systems in place to maximise the effectiveness of our practice. It applies to activities arranged and managed by the BBKA, it does not apply to activities of individual Area Association Members, each of which will have its own arrangements in place. 

All BBKA Area Association Members which work with unaccompanied children and vulnerable adults should have a Safeguarding Policy which must be implemented. Having a Safeguarding Policy is a mandatory requirement for organizations working with children where parents are not present.   

The purpose of this policy is: 

  • to protect children, young people and vulnerable adults who receive the British Beekeepers’ Association’s services. This includes the children of adults who use our services; 
  • to familiarise those directly involved with children, young people and vulnerable adults with the wider context of safeguarding and to provide parents, staff and volunteers with the overarching principles that guide our approach to child protection; 
  • to ensure appropriate action is taken in the event of incidents/concerns of abuse and support provided to the individual/s who raise or disclose the concern; 
  • ensure everyone understands their roles and responsibilities in respect of safeguarding and is provided with appropriate learning opportunities to recognise, identify and respond to signs of abuse, neglect and other safeguarding concerns relating to children and young people. 

“The long-term success of beekeeping as a craft depends upon sustaining and developing the broadest possible base of participation. Part of this strategy is based upon the encouragement of participation by children, young people and vulnerable adults within a safe and secure environment that protects them fully while developing their potential.”  

The BBKA accepts a moral responsibility to implement procedures to provide a duty of care for children, young people and vulnerable adults, to safeguard the wellbeing of children, young people and vulnerable adults and protect them from physical, sexual or emotional harm and from neglect and or bullying.  

The policy recognises that the welfare and interests of children, young people and vulnerable adults are paramount in all the circumstances. It aims to ensure that regardless of age, ability or disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation, socio-economic background, all children:  

  • have a positive and enjoyable experience whilst participating in activities at the BBKA in a safe and children centered environment; and 
  • are protected from abuse whilst participating in any activities provided by the BBKA or outside of the activity.  

Beekeeping can have a very powerful and positive influence on people – especially children, young people and vulnerable adults. Not only can it provide opportunities for enjoyment and achievement, it can also develop valuable qualities such as self-esteem, self-confidence, leadership and teamwork.  

The BBKA is committed to providing information to educate those working with children, young people and vulnerable adults to adopt best practice to ensure the safety and welfare of everyone within the craft of beekeeping.  

This document sets out the principles and procedures to be adopted by the BBKA in its entirety. This, as with all BBKA policies, is a working document and shall be regularly reviewed against governance changes, laws and government acts.  

This policy applies to anyone working for or on behalf of the BBKA, including the Board of Trustees, officers, paid staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students.  

Legal framework 

1.1 Legislation and Guidance 

This policy has been drafted on the basis of legislation, policy and guidance that seeks to protect children in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.  

BBKA is mindful of its obligations under various statutes, including:  

  • The Children Act 1989 and the Children Act 2004 (partially amended by the Children and Social Work Act 2017) 
  • The Protection of Children Act (PoCA) 1999 
  • Statutory Guidance of Supervision of activity with children  
  • The Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 
  • Department for Education’s Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018 (replacing the 2015 guidance) published on 5 July 2018 
  • Keeping Children Safe in Education 2019 
  • The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child  
  • The Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000  
  • The Police Act 1997  
  • The Data Protection Act 2018 and the UK retained version of the General Data Protection Regulation (UK GDPR) 
  • The Disclosure and Barring Service  
  • Central Registered Body Scotland The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 and The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act (NI Order) 1978 (UK Wide)  
  • Sexual Offences Act 2003 
  • The Care Standards Act 2000 (This does not apply to N Ireland) and the Care Act 2014  
  • The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974  
  • The Human Rights Act 1998  
  • The Regulation of Care (Scotland) Act 2001  
  • Protection of Children (Scotland) Act 2003  
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006 (Parliament has established statutory body to take the decisions on who should be barred – the Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA)  
  • Mental Health Act 2005 
  • Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups (Northern Ireland) Order 2007  

1.2 BBKA Disclaimer for Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults 

The information in this policy is intended for use in relation to the BBKA only, and as such should not be considered as providing policies, guidelines or information covering any specific situation. The BBKA does not accept any liability to any person relating to any use of, or reliance upon, the material contained in the publication.  

Policy and Procedure 

2.1 Introduction  

As a National Governing Body of beekeeping, the BBKA takes its responsibilities to children, young people and vulnerable adults who participate in beekeeping, at any and all levels, very seriously. BBKA strives to create an environment where individuals can be healthy, stay safe, enjoy and achieve and make a positive contribution. This policy, together with the good practice guidelines clarifies what is expected of all BBKA trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students 

This policy should be read alongside our organisational policies and procedures including:  

  • School Visits Policy 
  • Whistle Blowing Policy  
  • Alcohol and Drugs Policy  
  • Volunteer Policy 
  • Code of Conduct for Trustees 

2.2 Principles  

The BBKA Policy for Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults is based upon the following fundamental principles:  

We believe that: 

  • Children, young people and vulnerable adults should never experience abuse of any kind 
  • we have a responsibility to promote the welfare of all children, young people and vulnerable adults, to keep them safe and to practice in a way that protects them 
  • we must be accountable for our safeguarding practices and transparent as to how we implement these.  

2.2.1 Children, Young People & Vulnerable Adults 

We recognise that:  

  • whilst dealing with children, young people and vulnerable adults, their welfare is and always must be the paramount consideration, whatever their age, culture, disability, gender and whatever their language, racial origin, religious beliefs and/or sexual orientation.  
  • the rights, dignity and worth of every child, young person and vulnerable adult must always be respected.  
  • all children, young people and vulnerable adults, must be listened to and have their views considered according to their age, maturity and understanding.  
  • all children, young people and vulnerable adults, taking part in beekeeping with the BBKA, have a right to participate in an enjoyable and safe environment.  
  • all incidents/suspicions of abuse, poor practice and allegations will be taken seriously and responded to in a timely and appropriate manner.  
  • we must and shall work in partnership with other organisations, children, young people, parents and carers. 

We will seek to keep children and young people safe by: 

  • valuing, listening to and respecting them 
  • appointing a Designated Safeguarding Officer (DSO) for children, young people and vulnerable adults  
  • adopting child protection and safeguarding best practice through our policies, procedures and code of conduct for trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students, ensuring that all those working with and for the BBKA understand their roles and responsibilities in respect of safeguarding and have the information and training to recognise, identify and respond to signs of abuse, neglect and other safeguarding concerns relating to children and young people  
  • developing and implementing an effective School Visits Policy  
  • staff, trustees and volunteers are not permitted to take photographs of children visiting the BBKA premises or events  
  • providing effective management for trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students through supervision, support, training and quality assurance measures  
  • recruiting trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students safely, ensuring all necessary DBS and all other required checks are made  
  • ensuring that confidential, detailed and accurate records of all safeguarding concerns are maintained and securely stored   
  • using our safeguarding procedures to share concerns and relevant information with agencies who need to know, and involving children, young people, vulnerable adults, parents, families and carers appropriately  
  • using our procedures to manage any allegations against trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students appropriately  
  • creating and maintaining an anti-bullying environment and ensuring that we have a policy and procedure to help us deal effectively with any bullying that does arise   
  • ensuring that we have effective complaints and whistleblowing measures in place  
  • ensuring that we provide a safe physical environment for children, young people, vulnerable adults, trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students, by applying health and safety measures in accordance with the law and regulatory guidance.  

2.2.2 Recognising signs of abuse 

BBKA recognises that some children, young people and vulnerable adults, can be particularly vulnerable to abuse and we accept the responsibility to take reasonable and appropriate steps to ensure their welfare. There are four types of abuse which can cause long term damage to a child or young person: 

Physical Abuse: This may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating, or otherwise causing physical harm. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent/carer or other individual fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child. 

Emotional Abuse: This is the persistent emotional mistreatment of an individual, for example behavior that causes severe and persistent adverse effects on an individual’s emotional development. It may invoke feelings within an individual that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only in so far as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or “making fun” of what they say or how they communicate, or placing developmentally inappropriate expectations on children. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another, bullying (including cyber- bullying) causing children to often feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.  

Sexual Abuse: This involves forcing or enticing a child, young person or vulnerable adult to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non- penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing They may include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual online images, watching sexual activities, or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children. 

Neglect: This is a persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs. 

Possible signs of abuse include: 

Unexplained or suspicious injuries. These include bruising, cuts or burns, particularly if situated on a part of the body not normally prone to such injuries or the explanation of the cause of the injury is does not seem right. The child discloses abuse, or describes what appears to be an abusive act. 

  • Someone else (child or adult) expresses concern about the welfare of another child. 
  • Unexplained change in behaviour such as withdrawal or sudden outbursts of temper. 
  • Inappropriate sexual awareness or sexually explicit behaviour. 
  • Distrust of adults, particularly those with whom a close relationship would normally be expected. 
  • Difficulty in making friends. 
  • Eating disorders, depression, self-harm or suicide attempts. 

Additional forms of abuse are relevant to adults, these include: 

Institutional Abuse: This is the mistreatment or neglect of an adult at risk by a regime, or individuals within settings and services, that adults at risk live in or use. Such abuse violates the person's dignity, resulting in lack of respect for their human rights. 

Modern Slavery: This can take various forms, all of which result in the deprivation of a person's liberty by another in order to exploit them for personal or commercial gain. 

Discriminatory Abuse: This occurs when values, beliefs or culture result in a misuse of power that denies opportunities to some groups or individuals. 

Financial and material Abuse:  This can include the theft, fraud, exploitation and the misuse of or misappropriation of property, possessions or benefits. 

2.2.3    Adults who work with children, young people and vulnerable adults 

We recognise that: 

  • All adults who work with children, young people and vulnerable adults, have a right to be treated with respect and dignity irrespective of their gender, disability, ‘race’, sexual orientation, marital status, age, religious or political belief and offending background.  
  • All adults who work with children young people and vulnerable adults have a right to know what the BBKA expects of them in terms of their responsibilities and conduct towards others.  
  • All adults who work with children, young people and vulnerable adults have a right to fair and just treatment whenever a concern is raised about them including their conduct towards others.  

2.2.4 Parents  

  • Parents have a right to expect that the BBKA, to which they entrust their children and young people, provide appropriate care and protection for them.  
  • It is the right of a parent/guardian to be able to check how well the BBKA is run for the sake of the child’s, young person’s or vulnerable adult’s safety and the parent’s peace of mind. 

2.3 BBKA’s Responsibilities  

It is important the following responsibilities are adhered to: Under the Government Guidance “Working Together to Safeguard Children 2018”, the BBKA has a responsibility to safeguard those children and young people from abuse and neglect. (Refer to Every Child Matters Website http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk)  

 BBKA has a duty of care to safeguard all children, young people and vulnerable adults involved in activities run by the BBKA. Any matters giving rise to concern of children or young people’s welfare e.g. abuse, poor practice and allegations shall be taken seriously and responded to in a timely and appropriate manner.  

Confidentiality shall be upheld in line with the Data Protection Act 2018 and the UK GDPR and the Human Rights Act 2000.  

BBKA shall work in partnership with the Police, Children’s Social Care Services and local Safeguarding Children’s Boards (LSCB’s) in accordance with their procedures. We recognise that this is essential to enable these organisations to carry out their statutory duties to investigate concerns and protect all children, young people and vulnerable adults.  

It is the responsibility of the child protection external experts, i.e. Children’s Social Care Services/Police, to determine whether or not abuse has taken place but it is everyone’s responsibility to report any concerns.  

Recruitment of staff, volunteers and external professionals is undertaken according to the guidelines for good practice and recruitment procedures contained in this policy to safeguard and protect children and young people from abuse and themselves against allegations.  All those who wish to work for or with the BBKA will need to show an understanding of safeguarding that is relevant to the role that they are applying for. 

2.4 Implementing the Policy  

The first step towards a meaningful and effective safeguarding policy is implementation. The policy has to be put “into practice” to become effective.  

Effective implementation will:  

  • Promote a consistent response to all child protection matters  
  • Help maximise child safety and protection whilst in the care of the BBKA  
  • Reassure staff and volunteers by increasing their confidence to engage in activities with children, young people and vulnerable adults 
  • Reduce the risk of litigation against the BBKA 

The Designated Safeguarding Officer will maintain an overview of safeguarding concerns, take a lead on liaising with other agencies and shall keep informed about local developments in safeguarding. The Designated Safeguarding Officer shall ensure effective training on the contents of this policy and its procedures by all those working with and for The British Beekeepers’ Association. 

2.4.1 Acting on a safeguarding concern 

It is not the responsibility of the BBKA’s employees or volunteers to decide whether or not a child is being abused or might have been abused. However, safeguarding is ‘everybody’s responsibility’, therefore, there is a responsibility to act on concerns to protect children in order that appropriate agencies can then make enquires to take any necessary action to protect children. 

The following procedures and guidance are to assist those working for the BBKA when dealing with safeguarding concerns. This will be divided into the following sections: 

What to do if you are concerned about a child resulting from your suspicions or a child’s disclosure 

If anyone is concerned that a child or vulnerable adult is at risk of being abused or neglected, they should not ignore their suspicions and should not assume that someone else will take action to protect that person. 

If you have reason to believe that a child or young person is at immediate risk from harm contact the Police on 999. 

Otherwise, concerns should be reported to the Designated Safeguarding Officer who shall then refer concerns about children to the children’s social care department of the local authority where the child lives, or to the relevant local authority adult services department.  

What to do if an adult or vulnerable adult experiencing abuse tells you about it or you hear/suspect abuse 

  • If necessary, act to protect the adult at risk 
  • assure them that you are taking them seriously 
  • listen carefully to what they are saying, stay calm and get a clear and factual picture of the concern 
  • be honest and don’t make any promises you cannot keep 
  • immediately inform the Designated Safeguarding Officer 
  • if a crime has or may have been committed, contact the police to discuss or report it. 

If you hear about an incident of abuse from someone else, encourage them to report it themselves or help them to report the facts of what they know.  

If you are worried about an adult who is working with young children 

When an employee or volunteer has behaved in a way that has harmed, or may have harmed, a child, young person or vulnerable adult, this must be taken seriously and dealt with sensitively and promptly. This should be reported immediately to the Designated Safeguarding Officer. 

Assent  

  • The General Manager should ensure all BBKA trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students have a copy of the BBKA Policy 
  • All BBKA trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students must agree to abide by the BBKA Policy for Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults.   

A copy of the policy is also available on the BBKA Website www.bbka.org.uk  

2.5 Actions taken by the BBKA  

  • The BBKA has updated this Safeguarding Policy for Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults.  
  • BBKA will annually review and where required update the policy for Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults.  
  • BBKA will maintain confidential records of all complaints, concerns and sanctions against the BBKA trustees, officers, staff, volunteers, seasonal workers, agency staff and students. 
  1. The BBKA has highly recommended that all Area Association Members have a safeguarding policy and they ensure that their Association policy is accessible to all members of their Association. 
  • The BBKA has highly recommended that all Area Association Members have a ‘Responsible Adult’ appointed.  

2.6 Monitoring Procedures  

The BBKA Policy for Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults will be reviewed annually, or in the following circumstances:  

  • In accordance with changes in legislation and guidance on the protection of children, young people and vulnerable adults. 
  • As required by the Local Safeguarding Children Board  
  • Following any issues or concerns raised about the protection of children and young people within the BBKA.  
  • Any other circumstances that may arise or as a result of any significant change or event.  

Contact details 

Designated Safeguarding Officer (DSO) 

General Manager Phone/email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

 

Senior lead for safeguarding  

Chair Phone/email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

British Beekeepers Association 

National Beekeeping Centre, Stoneleigh Park, Kenilworth CV8 2LG 

Telephone: 02476 696679 

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

I, ________________________   [insert name], have received a copy of the BBKA Safeguarding Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults Policy and I confirm I have read it. 

Signature: ____________________________ Date: _____________________